Adobe Photoshop Day Cream

July 13, 2010

The secret of great models everywhere:

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Source: Technosexual Monkeys

And it was used even before Photoshop was invented:

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Source for image above and next image: Giopet’s Graphic Art blog (Italy)

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A favorite of La Wanda Gastrica!

And of advertising agencies everywhere.

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Worldwide Ad Spend Continues its Dramatic Decline

July 11, 2009

A July 9th report in Adweek, quoting data from Nielsen’s Global AdView Pulse, states that “Advertising spending around the world dropped 7.2 percent in the first quarter of 2009 compared to the same period in 2008.”

The Nielsen site entry reports that “Though North America suffered the largest raw percentage decline of any region (-12.4%) with ad spend down 12.7% in the US, Nielsen said that Europe took the hardest hit overall…especially the individual countries of Spain (-28.2%), Ireland (-21.2%), Italy (-19.1%) and the UK (-14.7%).”

The picture would have looked worse except that “declines in global ad spend were stemmed somewhat by the Asia Pacific region, which posted only a 2.3% reduction vs. Q1 08. In Asia-Pacific, Indonesia’s elections helped that country post the most significant growth, with an increase of 19.1%. China also maintained growth but to a much lesser degree (+2.5%).” 

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Nielsen reports also that “advertising across all four traditional major media types (newspapers, TV, magazines and radio) was down in the quarter. Magazines fared the worst, down 17.4%, while newspapers saw a 9.1% decline. In North America, magazine ad spending was down 22.2 percent, while newspapers were off 15.6 percent.

Virtually all industry sectors were affected. “Automotive, financial services, and clothing and accessories — which Nielsen said tend to be particularly vulnerable to financial turmoil – posted the largest losses in ad spend, down 19.9%, 16.7% and 15.7% respectively.”

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 There was no mention of Internet advertising. However in a June 5th report, the IAB announced “In a recessionary environment that has hit other media sectors with greater force, Internet advertising revenues in the U.S. were at $5.5 billion for the first quarter of 2009, according to the numbers released today by the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) and PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (PwC). The figure represents a 5% decline over the same period in 2008.

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Nevertheless, as David Silverman, PwC Assurance partner, noted “Current economic conditions are clearly challenging. Nonetheless, interactive media continues to consume a larger piece of the overall advertising pie.”

True. But also a reminder that even the mighty Internet is vulnerable in tough times.

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The End of Advertising as We Know It

November 23, 2007

An extraordinary monograph has just been published by, of all the unlikely sources, the IBM Institute for Business Value. The End of Advertising as We Know It (PDF) is a publication that is everything you would not expect from a large corporation’s public information efforts: it’s informative, well-researched and well-written, and often provocative, all the while portraying no bias towards IBM, nor making even the slightest attempt to sell IBM services.

The four well-qualified authors base many of their observations and conclusions on a series of surveys and interviews with both consumers and a range of advertising executives (both from the agencies, and from within large corporations). The result is must-reading for anyone interested in the impact of changing technologies and media on the future of advertising.

The text is 21-pages long, so I won’t attempt an extensive recap here: just read the original. Here are several reasons why you must; mostly just direct quotations from the report:

– “Our analysis shows that the actual growth of Internet advertising has outpaced forecasts by 25 to 40 percent over the past two years.”

– “This is the first study I’ve read that intelligently challenges what the future role of advertising agencies will be, and, even more directly, asks “Will advertisers still need a traditional agency?”

– “Amateurs and semi-professionals are now creating lower-cost advertising content that is arguably as appealing to consumers as versions created by agencies.”

– “Advertising inventory is increasingly bought and sold through efficient open exchanges, bypassing traditional intermediaries.”

– “Relevancy outweighs creativity in TV commercials. The ads least likely to be skipped were well-tailored to their audience.”

– “Will consumers reject outright the concept of interruption marketing in the future?”

This is the first advertising report I’ve read that dares to ask the really tough questions about the future of advertising. As they say, you may agree or disagree, but you’re guaranteed to be challenged and provoked.

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