Visuals Signal the Change in Publishing

November 13, 2013

Before and After Typhoon Haiyan
Snow FallThe Wall Street Journal (fortunately not behind their anally-retentive firewall) offers a relatively simple but very powerful photographic feature looking at “Before and After Typhoon Haiyan” in the Philippines. (more…)

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Google’s New “In-Depth Articles” Feature a Boon to Book and Periodical Publishers

August 10, 2013

Google just announced that they will reward the authors of the very best in-depth articles on popular search topics by highlighting the top three in page 1 search results. Google offers a range of sample topics in its announcement: censorship, Gloria Steinem, Lego, the NSA, the United Nations, and Taylor Swift. I’d bet that the criteria is two-part: an unambiguous subject, one that’s in reasonable search demand. Think not only “the Bible” but also the “New Testament” and the “Old Testament.” Then “Genesis”, “Exodus”, “Leviticus” as well as “Matthew”, “Mark”, “Luke” and “John”. You get my drift. (more…)

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Read & Watch the Future of Publishing at the New York Times

December 22, 2012

I feel like I’m coming in from the Web wilderness as I start viewing John Branch’s, Snow Fall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek on the New York Times site. Snow blows across a mountain peak as the saga of an deadly avalanche begins to spill down the page: “Avalanche! Elyse!” 650 words later and the reader has an option to see a 45-second clip with Elyse Saugstad, “a professional skier,” a survivor. (more…)

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Boxie, the Story-Gathering Robot

December 31, 2011

Robotics is advancing by leaps and bounds, in no small part because of the superb FIRST robotics competition launched by Dean Kamen in 1989.

A new development with value to the future of publishing is Boxie, the Story-Gathering Robot, invented by Alexander Reben at the renowned M.I.T. Media Lab. Boxie is a robotic journalist; it could handle those “man on the street” videos with ease. (more…)

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Books are Optimized for No Participation

November 16, 2011

Over at PressThink Jay Rosen observed that professional journalism has been optimized for low participation. He explains that “until a few years ago, the ‘job’ of the user was simply to receive the news and maybe send a letter to the editor.” This was a logical outcome of the available technology. “Journalists built their practices on top of a one-way, one-to-many, broadcasting system,” he noted. (more…)

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